• Welcome to the forum of professional participants of the drug market!

    Here you will get all the necessary information about organizing a laboratory of any size, from a small kitchen at home to an industrial facility.
    And if you have your own production, here you will find all the relevant information to improve efficiency and safety.
    In the sections of the forum you will find:

    • Methods of synthesis and analysis;
    • Suppliers of chemicals and equipment;
    • Descriptions of the pharmacological action of substances;
    • Business technologies.

Special Mail Covers, what they are, and why the USPIS had the information regarding them redacted.

nomad

New member
Joined
Feb 22, 2022
Messages
12
Reaction score
9
Points
3
The DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration, the USPIS (United States Postal Inspection Service), and the DHS (Department of Homeland Security). These agencies work together to bring down people like you. They have unlimited resources, unlimited time, and are ruthless in their pursuit. You will get on their radar eventually - and when you are, they will work together to erase you from it. Before we get into the "fun stuff", you need to do research on those who seek to take your freedom away. The USPIS is generally going to be the beginning of all of this, so let's understand their work just a little better.

The USPIS are not "rent a cops". They are licensed to carry firearms and make arrests, and do so frequently. If you have not properly prepared one single package, it can be the smoking gun that will come back to bite you in the ass. Not only do they have forensic labs to lift fingerprints off any possible surface on the package, they have a very damning tool that they have made attempts to keep secret from the public. They have even redacted it from public documents.

The new version of the USPS Classified National Security Information Program handbook (AS-303) added a new 9 page section, which they don't want to disclose because they claim it "would disclose techniques and procedures for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions, or would disclose guidelines for law enforcement investigations or prosecutions if such disclosure could reasonably be expected to risk circumvention of the law" (5 USC 552(b)(7)(E))

Based on information gathererd by mail covers (You can thank Informed Delivery, too), the USPS has a map linking you to packages that have been received at your address. Do you reup from the same vendor, in the same city, in the same state? Even so much as two orders will be a causational link determining that you're in contact with that individual. What if they get busted? Clearly, if they're a supplier, they'll be using fake return addresses, but always real destinations (ie. you) - so if your name happens to be on one of those packs, you're going to have a hard time denying that you're not expecting anything when you just got the same pack last month and they have the evidence for it.

Speaking to that last point - the "I'm not expecting anything" routine that you commonly hear spouted on Dread among other places as ways to keep you safe - it doesn't work. When the USPIS has reached the point of an investigation that they're comfortable making you aware that there's an investigation on you, you're already fucked. You made a mistake somewhere, and they know that. In the event they *dont* tell you, and attempt to initiate a controlled delivery, *leaving the package at the door or refusing it does not work.* Do you really think they'd just say "Ah, shit, he beat us!" - no, multiple cases that you can find via PACER (and RECAP) specifically note that the defendant had left the package at the door for x hours while the police officers just chilled nearby. They're not letting that package out of their sight. You can write "RTS" on it, but they'll just go grab it and knock on your door.

Again, speaking on that last point, if the police knock on your door, NEVER open it unless they have a warrant. Simply opening a door can be interpreted as "inviting" an officer into your home. It's slimey, I know, but it happens.

So, with this information, how do we reliably source our product? Well, hopefully, offline. If you're buying and reshipping your product, you're opening a huge attack vector for law enforcement and I don't advise you continue down this route. If you're getting your product from an offline distributor, completely different story.



[Taken from a WIP textbook I'm putting together regarding highly guarded information on how the USPIS, DEA, and HSI investigate and prosecute vendors. Release date unknown, there's some information I don't think should be in the public and I'm wrestling with myself on releasing it or not]



MqJZ8IvSbo
Pl7XE6tMAg

HOSW2Qj85k
 

Attachments

  • 7jNVRhdt6L.png
    7jNVRhdt6L.png
    483.8 KB · Views: 251
  • tDw3JK4ZuA.png
    tDw3JK4ZuA.png
    159.7 KB · Views: 247

HEISENBERG

Administrator
Staff member
ADMIN
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
1,222
Reaction score
430
Points
83
Delivering drugs by mail has long been unsafe. There are more anonymous methods of delivery - Dead drop.
 

nomad

New member
Joined
Feb 22, 2022
Messages
12
Reaction score
9
Points
3
Delivering drugs by mail has long been unsafe. There are more anonymous methods of delivery - Dead drop.
That requires extraordinary local connections. There's almost an entirely new class of drug user these days, one who is so deeply tied to the Internet that it would only make sense to call them cyber-druggies.

And most of these people don't know of any other way to get access to those obscure drugs and with the proliferation of underground markets, shipping drugs isn't going to go away anytime soon.

I've been struggling internally with revealing more of just *how* the USPIS busts a new vendor, but I was told the following by a friend and I think I agree.

"And in my honest opinion, that information should be gatekeeped, and shared with people who prove they want to learn. I can see, and agree with, the mindset of making the community a better place with more up-to-date information, but it's always a catch, either catching the wrong set of eyes, or worse, getting people who shouldn't be vending into this space. I understand we all had a starting point, but for a lot of people, myself included, I had to learn on my own, or with the help of people directly."
 

HEISENBERG

Administrator
Staff member
ADMIN
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
1,222
Reaction score
430
Points
83
I spent many hours-days-weeks-months studying information about anonymous vending methods. I came to the unequivocal conclusion that the dead drop system is easily scalable and less likely to be detected by law enforcement. After all, it is not for nothing that even intelligence agencies use such methods for conspiracy when transmitting information. This method of distribution is not without its drawbacks, just like any other. But if properly organized, the organization can exist autonomously almost indefinitely. It all depends on how the structure is built. Imagine that within a few months you can build an organization based on anonymity, where no one knows each other, numbering, for example, 100 people. And that organization makes at least 1,000 retail transactions a day. And that's just the beginning.
The problem is that the existing darknet markets don't provide the functionality to do that. There is also the problem of the lack of "mass consumer". If the dead-drop system becomes mass-market and overshadows mail-order, then all those who used to buy drugs on the street will come to the darknet. Then the fun begins.
 

nomad

New member
Joined
Feb 22, 2022
Messages
12
Reaction score
9
Points
3
I spent many hours-days-weeks-months studying information about anonymous vending methods. I came to the unequivocal conclusion that the dead drop system is easily scalable and less likely to be detected by law enforcement. After all, it is not for nothing that even intelligence agencies use such methods for conspiracy when transmitting information. This method of distribution is not without its drawbacks, just like any other. But if properly organized, the organization can exist autonomously almost indefinitely. It all depends on how the structure is built. Imagine that within a few months you can build an organization based on anonymity, where no one knows each other, numbering, for example, 100 people. And that organization makes at least 1,000 retail transactions a day. And that's just the beginning.
The problem is that the existing darknet markets don't provide the functionality to do that. There is also the problem of the lack of "mass consumer". If the dead-drop system becomes mass-market and overshadows mail-order, then all those who used to buy drugs on the street will come to the darknet. Then the fun begins.
It actually has been done before, just not in the United States ;)

And yes, it became Russia's largest dark net market, and was focused only on dread drops.

Who knows what the future holds for other countries once the mailing system becomes too risky? There needs to be inventive for innovation in the market scene, but right now all we see is lazy copy/paste Eckmar scripts (for good reason - they make money.)
 

HEISENBERG

Administrator
Staff member
ADMIN
Joined
Jun 24, 2021
Messages
1,222
Reaction score
430
Points
83
It actually has been done before, just not in the United States ;)

And yes, it became Russia's largest dark net market, and was focused only on dread drops.

Who knows what the future holds for other countries once the mailing system becomes too risky? There needs to be inventive for innovation in the market scene, but right now all we see is lazy copy/paste Eckmar scripts (for good reason - they make money.)
Things change. Maybe our team can surprise everyone in the near future. However, the drug distribution system is too conservative, and it will be hard to change things. It is necessary to give choice and opportunity, time will show which model is more resistant to the changing world.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

nomad

New member
Joined
Feb 22, 2022
Messages
12
Reaction score
9
Points
3
Things change. Maybe our team can surprise everyone in the near future. However, the drug distribution system is too conservative and it will be hard to change things. It is necessary to give choice and opportunity, time will show which model is more resistant to the changing world.
I believe you put it best yourself in your About section: "Innovation fuels our daily goal to shape the future!"

Dread was being developed before /r/DarkNetMarkets was shut down, and was actually an innovative platform at the time. But after that ban, it became much, much different. The massive influx of users expected the "new /r/darknetmarkets", and a lot of those innovative features put in place by HugBunter was just completely removed, such as the market security analysis reports.

Innovation requires a gifted mind. Human beings are hard-wired to resist change. It takes a drastic event to change the mentality of these people, or just a gifted mind with a vision so grand it becomes nothing short of inspiring.
 
Top